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Podcast | How to evaluate the quality of a consultant?

It's not easy to find a consulting firm that meets all of your criteria, but it's well worth the effort! By following this straightforward process, you'll find the best fit for you and your project. On this week’s Smart consulting Sourcing podcast, I tell you how to...

Podcast | How to qualify a consulting firm for a project?

There are several markers that define the “Consulting DNA” of a company: the obvious capability & industry experience, but also the footprint, culture, and delivery model. On this week’s Smart consulting Sourcing podcast, I tell you how to qualify a consulting...

Podcast | How to find the right consultants for your projects?

The first question is not "do I need a consultant?" Instead ask yourself: do I have an urgent problem? If yes, find your best understanding of the issue and why it needs a solution. Then ask yourself: what kind of consultant can solve this issue? Another way to put it...

Podcast | Why you should put consultants in competition?

As an executive, you're probably used to making quick decisions. Given the amount of work that you have to do, you can't afford to dither. Is it worth your time to organize a competition when choosing your consultants? On this week’s Smart consulting Sourcing podcast,...

Podcast | How to build positive relationships with your consulting firms?

Positive and mutually beneficial relationships with business partners, clients, and collaborators are essential for every project. And effective communication is a crucial ingredient in every relationship. On this week’s Smart consulting Sourcing podcast, I give you...

Podcast | 7 questions about internal vs external consultants

People often ask the differences between internal and external consultants. How independent are External and Internal Consultants? How does skills/experience level vary? Let's tackle the 7 most common questions you migh have and never dare to ask about internal...

Podcast | How to choose between generalist vs specialized consultants?

If you're looking for the right consultant, several factors will help you decide whether a specialist or a generalist is right for your needs. On this week’s Smart consulting Sourcing podcast, I discuss how to choose between generalist vs specialized consultants? Key...

Podcast | How to create value through demand management?

Demand management is a critical tool for procurement professionals and companies in general. But what are the key steps that can ensure successful Demand Management execution? On this week’s Smart consulting Sourcing podcast, I talk about how to create value through...

Podcast | Working with large consultancies: stop or encore

As clients have started to understand better what value consultants can bring them, many changes will shape the industry's future. Should you continue working with large consultancies? On this week’s Smart consulting Sourcing podcast, I answer the question: Working...

Podcast | The 8 Defining Stages in the History of Consulting

The History of Consulting goes way back. Indeed, consulting has always existed. We can trace advisors to decision-makers back to the Antiquity. How old is Consulting? On this week’s Smart consulting Sourcing podcast, I tell you a brief History of Consulting. Key...

This Week In Consulting: Is Risk Management hindering Growth?

compensation strategy

Wednesday, October 20th 2021

This week in
Consulting

Is Risk Management hindering Growth?

This week’s must read

Covid will change people’s minds, but not all pandemics will be like this one, and history isn’t always the best predictor of the future. The same can be said about new risks, which is why it’s critical to constantly stress test ideas and collaborate with various people outside of your industry and comfort zone.

This Week’s Must Read is an insight piece from Lucy Stanbrough, Willis Towers Watson on how to gain insight on the emerging risks and interconnections between drivers and risks across 4 key trends.

Lucy Stanbrough @Willis Towers Watson

Thought Leadership

Chief risk officers who have been in the industry for a long time understand that there are known risks and unpredictable risks, and are now required to cope with unanticipated change on a regular basis. Dealing with such a situation necessitates a great deal of bravery, yet courage is a trait that is rarely mentioned in the context of risk management.

Michelle Daisley@OliverWyman

In this PwC’s Pulse Survey we will see that Risk managers have now largely managed the risks associated with having remote employees in many locations,even as the pandemic accelerated technological transformations. They are ready to capitalize on it. Now, risk professionals are seeing the upside that can come with a reimagined hybrid workforce.

Joseph Nocera, Tom Snyder, Dietmar Serbee and Tiffany Gallagher @Pwc

Financial technology firms provide a diverse variety of services, including payments, loans, savings, insurance, and, more recently, cryptocurrencies and their business models, products, and markets are continuously changing. How fintech companies may improve their risk management and utilize it as a business development facilitator.

Dafydd Hobbs @Gobeyond Partners

Not every decision necessitates extreme caution. For any high-impact decision when the danger of making the wrong option is significant, or where other people’s opinions on the optimal choice must be considered, a more methodical approach to decision-making is required.

Michael Barna@Kepner-Tregoe

This week’s Consulting News

| Kevin Surovcik@MorganFranklin Consulting

| Dr. Ricardo Gomez and Christoph Schlossarek@FTI Consulting

| @Bowman

| Mark Walters@KPMG

Keep in touch and get our bi-weekly email!

This week’s media

A review of the reforms and actions needed to overcome the economic, health and societal challenges the world has faced over the past year.

Consulting sourcing tips

Previous Weeks’ issues

5 Mistakes When Sourcing Consultants You Should Avoid

Consulting RFPs

5 Mistakes When Sourcing Consultants You Should Avoid

People make many mistakes when sourcing consultants, and it can be challenging to avoid them all. The following are five of the most common mistakes that people make when sourcing consultants.

5 Mistakes When Sourcing Consultants You Should Avoid

Overlooking the scoping.

One of the most cliche mistakes is not defining your expectations properly before discussing them with a consultant. It is easy to get caught up in excitement about their potential abilities that you forget why you needed them in the first place. As a result, you might end up with a project that doesn’t answer your needs. It is a waste of your time and your money.

READ ALSO

This guide will walk you through 4 steps that will help assess any consulting proposals you may receive in the future!

Most consulting firms I know love nothing more than a well-defined RFP, with minimal back and forth with the client for fine-tuning. Why? Because working on the requirements is an investment for the consultants and is rarely compensated.

Furthermore, a poor scope of work may lead to difficulties throughout the project: misinterpretation of expectations, bill disputes, and staff shortages.

Being transparent to the point of naivete

You must provide enough information about your firm, its sector, and the assignment’s context so that the consultancy can better comprehend the issue and propose tailored solutions.

You may also offer pointers on the budget and the anticipated timeline, so they don’t waste time considering numerous options. With a similar high-level scope of work, one consultancy may produce tens of diverse approaches.

But at the same time, you should keep the consulting firms on their toes until actually signing a contract with them. You don’t want to hand them all your bargaining chips at the beginning.

Don’t be afraid of negotiating but understand the link between scope, staffing, and price.

Working with the wrong consultants

Don’t use personal referrals as the only source for finding out who you want to hire. Indeed, you need to avoid using consultants who do not have experience or expertise related to your industry or company.

For example, if you’re launching a strategy project, don’t hire someone who has never let strategy projects before. On the other hand, if your firm is in the Agrobusiness industry and you need a consultant that understands the specificities of your sector, don’t ask consultants specialized in other sectors, even if they are strategy experts.

Be sure to hire consultants with the right skills for the right assignment! Hiring people outside their area of expertise can lead to disastrous results and might also be expensive if they need support from junior staff or other specialists.

Try not to look for miracle consultants either. There is very little chance you will find the consulting firm that fits your laundry list of expectations. Prioritize your needs. And if it is not enough, meet several consultancies to assess which approach would better solve your challenge.

Don’t forget about internal resources before purchasing external assistance. Though hiring consultants may often seem like the only solution at first glance, it’s important not to lose sight that there are many ways within your company itself to address specific issues.

Taking their claims at face value.

There is no right or wrong way to check references. Remember that sometimes consultants themselves are not entirely forthcoming when asked about their work history, so again, do not limit yourself to asking them directly!

Don’t be afraid to ask tough questions. However, if the consulting firm is unwilling to provide references and other information, you should probably take your business elsewhere!

Build a list of questions that are relevant to your project and your company. For instance, are your priorities… Their expertise? Their ability to build relationships? Their project management skills? Their ability to deliver impact?

Here is a simple method to ensure the references are suitable:

  • Real: Check the background of the referrals

  • Relevant: Make sure the projects mentioned have similarities with yours

  • Recent: The project was finished recently (usually less than 3 years)

  • Related: The reference concerns the project manager or the team 

Checking references will allow you to minimize the risks and maximize the impact of your project.

Disengaging once the consultant is hired.

When sourcing consultants, the bulk of the work begins after the ink has dried on the contract. You must keep track of and manage the project’s outcomes, as well as the project itself. Consulting projects seldom go according to plan.

Managing a consulting project is first and foremost managing a project. To maximize the chances of success of your project, you will need to address three elements: Stakeholders, Project, and Change.

Please don’t wait until the project is over to analyze its performance. And communicate your findings with the consultants. The reasons for poor performance can be numerous and simultaneous. For example, it might stem from the Consulting Firm (capabilities, skills, experience, etc.) or your teams (low priority, staffing, …).

In any case, it’s usually best to sit down with the Consulting Firm and figure out the problem together.

You must also manage the relationship with external consultants when you work with them. To begin, you’ll need to keep track of changes in the project that impact scope, staffing, timing, and unanticipated events.

If the modifications are significant, you should consider amending the contract. In any case, keep track of the changes in the Steering Committees’ minutes.

Consider the consulting firm as your partner with a shared objective: the completion of your project. Be adamant about the quality of the results. Give them feedback on their performance, as well as visibility on payments.

In the end, sourcing a consultant is an investment in your company. And as with any investment, it pays to do some research before you decide and manage the project. The good news? That’s what we’re here for! We’ve talked about 5 mistakes executives often make when they source consultants and how not to repeat them. If you’re still struggling, though, don’t hesitate to reach out – our team of experts is ready and waiting to partner with you on sourcing the right consulting partners to solve your challenges. So which mistake have you made while sourcing consultants?

Hélène Laffitte
Co-founder & CEO at Consulting Quest
Hélène is the author of Smart Consulting Sourcing, a step by step guide to getting the best ROI from your Consuting. You can follow @helenelaffitte on Twitter.

Hélène Laffitte is the CEO of Consulting Quest, a Global Performance-Driven Consulting Platform and author of “Smart Consulting Sourcing”, a step by step guide to getting the best ROI from your consulting. With a blend of experience in Procurement and Consulting, Hélène is passionate about helping Companies create more value through Consulting.

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Podcast | How to qualify a consulting firm for a project?

RFP

There are several markers that define the “Consulting DNA” of a company: the obvious capability & industry experience, but also the footprint, culture, and delivery model.

On this week’s Smart consulting Sourcing podcast, I tell you how to qualify a consulting firm for a project.

Key Takeaway: Having a list of consulting firms perfect on paper is not enough to qualify them for a project. You need to find out how real they are. You can’t just “go with your gut” here. A thorough reference check is the only way to find solid practice.
It’s not easy to find a consulting firm that meets all of your criteria, but it’s well worth the effort! By following this straightforward process, you’ll find the best fit for you and your project.

Transcript

 

Hello and welcome to episode 61 of our podcast: Smart Consulting Sourcing, THE podcast about Consulting Procurement.

My name is Hélène, and I’ll be your host today.

Each week I’ll give you the keys to better use, manage and source consulting services.

This week, I’ll tell you how to qualify a consulting firm for a project

Last week, I explained how to find the right consultants

We saw that your first step is to define what you are looking for. There are several markers that define the “Consulting DNA” of a company: the obvious capability & industry experience, but also the footprint, culture, and delivery model.

But building a list of potential Consulting firms is just the first stage in the process. A Consulting Firm might look like a perfect match on paper, but there is only one way to know if they have the right skills, industry experience, and project experience: talk to them!

So you need to put up a list of potential players. And the size of your project will determine the length of your list.

Consider including around fifteen to twenty firms in your first search if you need to find a mid-sized project and compare three prospective suppliers.

When I perform a search, I usually end up with 30% of the firms that don’t have a suitable “Consulting DNA Profile” and 30% that aren’t interested or available for the project as a baseline.

When you have finished compiling your first list, you need now to have a closer look at their characteristics to make sure they have the right profile.

Even though numerous consultancy firms claim to have competence in all capabilities in every sector, their track record shows it’s not true. Most of them, often tiny boutiques, specialize in just one capability or sector where they obtain most of their business. So, examine the case studies or previous projects listed on the firm’s website carefully.

Look also at the company’s previous clients: Who are they, and what do they do?

The background of the company’s founders is another valuable clue to the company’s primary objective, especially for tiny firms. But, first, take a look at the management team.

In their brochures or websites, most Consulting Firms will state their purpose or methodology. You’ll learn about who they are and how they operate. Are they focusing on high-level Strategy rather than implementation consulting? Are they working more on hard or soft aspects? Are they long-term consultants or former executives with prior corporate experience?

These elements will provide you with an understanding of who these consulting firms are and how they would interact with your organization.

Don’t just call any consultant, especially if the consulting firm is rather large. Each Partner comes with a unique set of talents and expertise, which will influence your project.

Consulting organizations are generally divided into industry experience or capabilities (when not both). They may also list the leadership team on their website with their contact information. If not, you should be able to find partners and check out their profiles using LinkedIn.

Thought leadership is also a handy tool. Check for papers or white papers on the subject of your project. The names of the authors and their contact information are often included in the materials.

Make sure they are working for the right firm by checking their present position on LinkedIn. The turnover in consulting is breathtaking; you may be one company behind. After that, you’ll probably add a few consulting firms to your list.

You should now have a list of consulting businesses that appear to have the proper people with the appropriate skills in the right locations. Your next move is to contact them and check their interest and availability face-to-face.

Three factors must be discussed in person: interest, availability, and compatibility. Next, connect with the consulting partners you’ve identified to schedule a call or a meeting after you’ve finished your list.

Here are a few pointers that you can use for these calls:

  • Listen to them. They’ll describe what they do and how they accomplish it. You’ll discover more about their culture, methodologies, and area of specialty.

  • Examine your list of criteria to verify whether they are a suitable match.

  • Avoid giving out too much information about the project. It’s still an exploratory call rather than a briefing, and you haven’t signed an NDA yet. However, you may describe the skills and previous work experience you’re searching for, as well as some information regarding the team in charge of the project.

  • Give them insight into the project’s likeliness to be launched and timeframe.

  • Give them a general sense of the budget. You don’t have to give a precise number, but you may let them know if you only have a small amount of money or if it’s a major project for your firm.

It is also critical to test your hypotheses and make sure they are interested in the project you want to start. It’s also a good time to see whether they’ll be able to commit and have the bandwidth for the endeavor.

Once you’ve completed that stage, talk with the project’s sponsor and leader to pick which of these businesses you want to include in your RFP.

After you’ve chosen a handful of consulting companies and begun the RFP process, the final stage is to verify their references. Don’t be fooled by the big display of logos in the presentations or the case studies on the website, which are both anonymous. Request at least two referrals for the project.

Take the time to contact the references and ask the appropriate questions. You may begin by listing the qualities that are most important to you, such as knowledge transfer, team collaboration, or company impact, for example. Make sure you ask all of your references and consulting firms the same questions. You can add a few customized questions to clarify some grey areas.

Consultants have a high turnover rate, with studies showing that it ranges from 15% to 20%. Partners and consultants move from one consulting firm to the next, get hired by clients, or start their own consultancy. Whole teams are replaced every 4 to 5 years by new talent.

A cutting-edge organization practice gathered brilliant people from all over the world in a top 10 Consulting Firm in 2012. Unfortunately, all the consultants had departed five years later, but the firm maintained the white papers and references in their presentations.

The leadership of your project and the experts involved are crucial aspects of success for a consulting engagement. Request references for the key team members. They must have been actively involved in the projects mentioned.

Make sure the reference is relevant.

First, it must be genuine. Don’t “duh” too quickly; we’ve seen consulting firms send the names of their former employees as references. To verify that they are actual persons and have held relevant jobs, check the reference’s name, position, and background.

Second, it must be on a project with similarities to yours. It may be a project with a comparable context, methodology, or industry. You want to make sure the consulting firm understands how to execute your project.

Third, the reference has to be current—the more recent, the better. Set a time limit (no more than five years is reasonable). The rate of progress in every sector and area has accelerated over the years. A project successfully led fifteen years ago may not tell us much about what would happen today.

You’ll want excellent references from the experts that they’ve made a significant contribution to their client’s company. It will also provide you with some data on their performance on the various dimensions crucial in your decision.

If you’ve chosen cultural fit as an important element of your project’s selection criteria, investigate how the consultants interacted with the teams and how they adapted to potential cultural differences.

Don’t accept compromises on the references. If the consulting firm is using confidentiality as a pretext to avoid reference checking, call Consulting Quest, we are a third-party expert and we can verify the credentials for you.

Having a list of consulting firms perfect on paper is not enough to qualify them for a project.  You need to find out how real they are. You can’t just “go with your gut” here. A thorough reference check is the only way to determine the performance of a consulting firm.

It’s not easy to find a consulting firm that meets all of your criteria, but it’s well worth the effort! By following this straightforward process, you’ll find the best fit for you and your project.

I spent a little time this week on the importance of checking references. In a way, you will need to get some measure of performance on similar projects. It is not very different from measuring the performance of your own consulting projects. And that’ll be the focus of next week’s episode: how to evaluate the quality of a consultant?

In the meantime, if you have any questions, or want to learn more about what we do at consulting quest, just send me an email at helene.laffitte@consultingquest.com
You can also have a look at our website smartconsultingsourcing.com to know more about our book and download free templates & guides to improve your consulting sourcing.

Bye and see you next week! Au revoir!

This Week In Consulting: Exploring space, the moon and the planets beyond

compensation strategy

Wednesday, October 13th 2021

This week in
Consulting

 Exploring space, the moon and the planets beyond

This week’s must read

With the increasing expansion of space operations in various nations, a rising number of corporate actors investing in space systems and their downstream applications, the space sector is now undergoing several structural changes.Both the demand and supply sides are affected by paradigm shifts.

This Week’s Must Read is an insight piece from Sebastien Plessis, Emerton about the on-going changes in the Space industry.

 Sebastien Plessis@Emerton

Thought Leadership

From the first lunar landing to the satellite race and SpaceX, space exploration has increased our knowledge of the universe and led to many innovations. While the promises are great, the risks remain.

Michael Collins@Magellan

Because of a tremendous need for images and communications throughout the world, the market for tiny satellites is rising like never before. Alexandre Tisserant, CEO of Kineis, and Manfred Hader, Roland Berger discuss the challenges of launching tiny satellites and his opinions on the excitement surrounding investments in microlauncher projects in this interview.

Manfred Hader@Roland Berger and Alexandre Tisserant@Kineis

Although there are doubts regarding the actual scale and long-term viability of the commercial-space industry, it looks to be on the verge of considerable expansion. The fundamental question is whether there will be economic activity in space that extends beyond tourism (for example, asteroid mining or manufacturing).

Chris Daehnick and Jess Harrington@McKinsey

Smaller launch vehicles will give access for prospective new entrants as the cost of commercial space exploration continues to fall.
Companies and organizations of all kinds are increasingly able to test innovative ways of producing products and offering better services in space.

Jeff Matthews@Deloitte

This week’s Consulting News

| Christoph Schweizer@BCG

| Tanyka M. Barber@TNG Consulting

| @Oliver Wyman

| @EY

Keep in touch and get our bi-weekly email!

This week’s media

Let’s dig into SpaceX and Elon Musk’s plans and mission to colonize Mars!

Consulting sourcing tips

Previous Weeks’ issues

Podcast | How to find the right consultants for your projects?

RFP
The first question is not “do I need a consultant?” Instead ask yourself: do I have an urgent problem? If yes, find your best understanding of the issue and why it needs a solution. Then ask yourself: what kind of consultant can solve this issue? Another way to put it would be: who should be part of my dream team to solve this issue?

On this week’s Smart consulting Sourcing podcast, I tell you how to find the right consultants.

Key Takeaway: Don’t start looking for consultants until you have a clear understanding of your needs. You can then translate your requirements into an ideal consulting DNA profile: capabilities, industry experience, geography & footprint, … Start with your internal resources (preferred providers for instance, recommendations, …) and broaden your search with consulting directories, thought leadership & professional organizations.

Transcript

 

Hello and welcome to episode 60 of our podcast: Smart Consulting Sourcing, THE podcast about Consulting Procurement.

My name is Hélène, and I’ll be your host today.

Each week I’ll give you the keys to better use, manage and source consulting services.

This week, I’ll tell you how to find the right consultants for your projects

Last week, I explained why you should put consultants in competition

We saw that It’s a good idea to evaluate several consultants by putting them in competition. It will enable you to make an informed choice on what consultant is right for you on many levels, such as skills, fit, and price. Along the way, you may even go for ideas that are completely out of the box you had yourself designed in your request for proposal.

But today, I’ll give you my tricks to find the right consultants. But before we get there, you must figure out what you need.

The first question is not “do I need a consultant?” Instead ask yourself: do I have an urgent problem? If yes, find your best understanding of the issue and why it needs a solution. Then ask yourself: what kind of consultant can solve this issue? Another way to put it would be: who should be part of my dream team to solve this issue?

What are the characteristics to look for, now that you know what you’re searching for? I call them markers, and the total sum of these markers makes the “consulting DNA” of a consulting firm.

Let’s return to the basics of consulting and of course, the obvious capabilities and industry dimensions are first on your list.

It is critical to understand which capabilities will be required for a project. Truth aside, Consulting Firms frequently describe their services differently than their clients do. They’re more likely to talk about what they do rather than the issues they address. They may also utilize technical jargon that their clients aren’t familiar with. You must act as a translator for them.

Our previous podcast “The 7 high-level capabilities every client should know” is a great place to start if you’re new to consulting.

Defining the type of industry expertise you require is simpler. However, be careful to include all the situation’s specifics and desired results to precisely describe what breadth and depth of knowledge you require.

For example, if you’re interested in the Oil & Gas sector, you might be interested in the industry as a whole, or your project might be about Upstream Operations, Exploration / Production, and Well Stimulation more specifically.

Now, you should consider the locations where the consultancy will need to operate, the languages it will have to speak, and the cultures it must comprehend. Consider also where and how the consulting team will have to communicate with project leaders.

Imagine a High-Tech company based in Germany with factories in Korea and the USA. They decide to hire a German consultancy that they worked with in the past. And now picture one of the German consultants explaining work organization in a Texas factory (that also works in Seoul actually). Yeah, you get the point.

Also consider the travel costs when deciding whether to hire a consulting firm. Long-distance consultants can add 25-30% to your project’s original budget. Do you need an on-site consultant? Is it possible to benefit from modern communication tools?

Besides, what are your policies for small businesses and freelancers? How long will your project take and how many locations will it require? Determining whether or not a larger firm with a global presence is right for your needs depends on your time constraints. If you only need help in one location and have a flexible schedule, you might be able to work with a smaller firm.

Now, knowing your budget is critical in identifying the best consultants for you. But, unfortunately, consulting costs vary by a factor of up to five from one company to the next. So it’s no surprise that bigger consulting firms charge more than smaller ones.

The size of a consulting firm is a pretty decent proxy of cost. If you have a limited budget, you’ll choose boutique stores in your region. If your funds are more plentiful, you may evaluate several sizes of consulting firms to see what works best for you.

This will also help you understand the trade-off between scope and cost, as well as the differences in size among businesses.

Now let’s talk credibility: there are 3 things that you need to look at: Brand, thought leadership, and partner profile.

Sometimes your project WILL require a brand. With board exposure or high political value, you want to work with big players. They will have credibility with the company’s top executives and investors, as well as the ability to roll with the punches if needed.

But let’s say you need deep expertise in multimodal transportation for process industries. Your teams dislike consultants because they “know nothing” or “are the school bus.” It’s time to bring in a consultant who knows about network distribution optimization and multimodal transportation. Your teams may warmly welcome someone who wrote books or articles on this subject. Same if they are former Supply Chain executives.

Now, consider how you want to work with your consultants. Do you want them to help you diagnose or devise a solution? Or do you want them to help you implement your plans? Rarely do firms excel at both. Besides, implementation consultants are usually less expensive than strategy consultants.

Another dimension to take into account is the hard vs. soft approach. For example, let’s imagine that you want to reorganize your procurement team and redesign the processes. First, ask yourself what your priority is: Is it to get the buy-in of your existing teams? Are you looking for a collaborative approach?

In that case, you need to look for a consultant with a high sensibility to change. But if your main priority is to get the work done, you will need a consultant more focused on the hard aspects of the project.

And, how senior do you need your consultants to be? If you want to professionalize your teams, you will need consultants that transfer knowledge. Hence, you want to work with senior consultants that have on-field experience. On the other hand, if you are mainly interested in the results of the project, then you could work with younger consultants supervised by a more senior colleague.

Companies now have more ethnic, cultural, and linguistic diversity than ever. Beyond language, management culture, business etiquette, communication preferences, and other aspects of business life vary by country.

Who hasn’t tapped her fingers on the table in frustration while waiting for late French, Italian, or Spanish colleagues? What Southern European hasn’t grumbled about their Germain or Dutch colleagues’ rigidity? Everywhere in the world, there are similar differences.

In Asia, you may need consultants who understand the local culture and speak the language. Building trust with clients’ teams is part of the consultant’s job. It’s high-level acrobatics when half the message is lost in translation.

There is no such thing as the perfect one-size-fits-all solution for all projects. As a result, identifying appropriate criteria to look for a potential match is critical. It’s also an excellent way to get everybody on board with the project.

Now let’s have a look at where to search, starting with the internal tools at your disposal.

Have a look at the resources from the procurement team, such as a list of Preferred Providers, an internal database of Consultants, or a list of consultants in your field. You could also have a database containing evaluation reports or prior bids that you can use to discover some interesting information.

Then, you may inquire about recommendations from your network/colleagues who have previously worked with Consultants.

The interest of internal sources is that you often have a direct evaluation or connection with the consulting firm. However, bear in mind our motto: “The Expert you know may not be the Expert you need.”

On top of your internal sources, don’t hesitate to use external sources to grow your list. External sources are very helpful when you don’t have internal resources available for your project.

You can use a marketplace or a directory of consulting firms. However, keep in mind that many consulting companies buy a membership to these directories, which makes them appear more credible than they actually are. Try to find platforms that include detailed performance reviews, such as Conavigo.com.

You may also connect with professional organizations in your field or the skills you are looking for to connect with specialized consultants or ask for recommendations from your peers.

Another option is to look for articles and books written on the subject you are interested in. Often management professors or authors are working as consultants as well.

There is also a large number of consultants listed on LinkedIn, but beware that this information can be outdated or incomplete.

Finally, you may use a simple Google Search (or Qwant or DuckDuckGo) to look for other firms.

And don’t forget to evaluate each firm based on your criteria, whether you’ve worked with them previously or not.

Now that you have a list of potential Consulting firms, it’s time to find out more about them. A Consulting Firm might look like a perfect match on paper, but there is only one way to know if they have the right skills, industry experience, and project experience: talk to them!

That’ll be the focus of next week’s episode: how to qualify a consulting firm for a project?

In the meantime, if you have any questions, or want to learn more about what we do at consulting quest, just send me an email at helene.laffitte@consultingquest.com
You can also have a look at our website smartconsultingsourcing.com to know more about our book and download free templates & guides to improve your consulting sourcing.

Bye and see you next week! Au revoir!

This Week In Consulting: Covid-19 is reshaping the future of business

compensation strategy

Wednesday, October 06th 2021

This week in
Consulting

Covid-19 is reshaping the future of business

This week’s must read

For more than a billion individuals throughout the world, COVID-19 brought normalcy to a standstill.
Here are some hypotheses on what could happen, to help us see fresh possibilities or hidden hazards related to the pandemic’s impact on individuals and societies. What will be different if we return to “normal”?

This Week’s Must Read is an insight piece from Gopi Billa, Andrew Blau and Philipp Willigmann, Deloitte about lasting effects of the worldwide pandemic.

Gopi Billa, Andrew Blau and Philipp Willigmann@Deloitte

Thought Leadership

Cisco has revised its strategic playbook, which contains six suggestions for all companies to consider, based on lessons gained from the pandemic and digital initiatives to solve e-commerce gaps.

Maria Martinez@Cisco for Cognizant

Due to constantly changing consumer expectations and an unparalleled rate of change, corporate executives’ demands for speed and flexibility have risen substantially post-COVID19.
This unique IBV Trending Insights report combines the findings of several proprietary consumer and executive polls performed in 2020: The reality for enterprises has changed dramatically after COVID19.

 @IBM Institute for Business Value

The significance of government resilience—the ability to absorb shocks, adapt, and prosper in a changing environment—has been highlighted by the COVID-19 epidemic. In an era of rising disruption, what resilience efforts can help governments to better protect and assist their citizens?

Daniel Acosta, Matthew Mendelsohn, Dr. Jay Patel, Martin Reeves, and Lucie Robieux@BCG

As they continue to deal with the effects of the COVID-19 epidemic, today’s CEOs confront an enormous task.
These business executives are responding to the crisis with a spirit of innovation, speeding digital transformation, developing flexible cost structures, and implementing agile operations.

 @Accenture

This week’s Consulting News

| @Accenture

| @KSM (Katz, Sapper & Miller) @Noble Consulting Services, Inc

| @Praxis Consulting

| Emma Taylor@ LACE Partner

Keep in touch and get our bi-weekly email!

This week’s media

In this video Bernard Marr, futurist, looks at the 6 key impacts Covid-19 and the coronavirus pandemic will have on businesses. Every business should rethink their operations in the context of these trends.

Consulting sourcing tips

Previous Weeks’ issues

Podcast | Why you should put consultants in competition?

RFP

As an executive, you’re probably used to making quick decisions. Given the amount of work that you have to do, you can’t afford to dither. Is it worth your time to organize a competition when choosing your consultants?

On this week’s Smart consulting Sourcing podcast, I explain why you should put consultants in competition.

Key Takeaway: It’s a good idea to evaluate several consultants by putting them in competition. It will enable you to make an informed choice on what consultant is right for you on many levels, such as skills, fit, and price. Along the way, you may even go for ideas that are completely out the box you had yourself designed in your request for proposal.

Transcript

 

Hello and welcome to episode 59 of our podcast: Smart Consulting Sourcing, THE podcast about Consulting Procurement.

My name is Hélène, and I’ll be your host today.

Each week I’ll give you the keys to better use, manage and source consulting services.

This week, I’ll explain why you should put consultants in competition

Last week, I gave you my tips to build positive relationships with your consulting firms

We saw that since consulting is a human-to-human service, the quality of your relationship with your consulting partners will directly affect the results of your projects. Putting the consultants in the right conditions to work, managing the project closely, and measuring performance are crucial steps to capture the right value from a consulting assignment.

 

But today, I am going to talk about putting consultants in competition.

As an executive, you’re probably used to making quick decisions. Given the amount of work that you have to do, you can’t afford to dither. It means that you may not always have the luxury of time to get a variety of perspectives before making each decision. However, when you’re hiring a consultant, it might be a good idea to take your time.

When you are clear on your priorities and why you need to hire a consultant, you can start looking for the best fit for your specific project and your organization. Of course, the easiest solution is to look into your pool of existing providers and choose to pick from them. However, the best consultant for one project is not necessarily the best for the next one. Besides, you may want to introduce some competition.

Of course, It’s necessary to find a consultant with solid experience, creative problem-solving skills, and great interpersonal skills. But how are you going to know the extent to which someone has these skills unless you have someone else to compare them to?

Let’s say you meet one consultant who impresses you with his impromptu pitch. You might be tempted to choose him, just so that you don’t have to meet with several different consultants, listen to their pitches, too, and read their proposals.  After all, this will mean a lot of work for you.

However, if you do all this work, you may find that different consultants have different strengths. For example, one might have great interpersonal skills, while another might have many more years of experience. One might be endlessly creative and great with design, while another might be a lot more blunt and honest about what’s really needed for your organization. A good way of identifying strengths and weaknesses is also to check references on prior similar assignments.

At this point, you’ll be better able to decide what’s more important to you. For some executives, the experience might be most impressive, while others might value creativity above all else.  For those who have a hard time making people understand exactly what they need, interpersonal skills might be paramount. Then, when you put consultants in competition, you’re more likely to find one with the exact qualities you’re looking for.

When executives outsource a task, they might already have certain ideas about how they want the task to be performed. But when you describe your functional needs and leave room for creativity in the proposed solutions, you get various perspectives. And you’re bound to come across some ideas you hadn’t thought of before. In fact, this is why people emphasize diversity in the workplace. When people from different backgrounds work together, they all tend to be more creative and develop new ideas.

Let’s assume, for example, that you’re trying to change your company culture and make your business one of the best places to work for employees. One consultant might suggest that you offer employees small perks such as tickets to sports events. Another consultant might suggest that you change your interiors so that they are more conducive to productivity. A third might suggest that you dismantle the hierarchical structure of your organization.

When you put consultants in competition, you’re likely to get more ideas you had never thought of before. These might shed new light on the tasks you’re trying to outsource and how they should be done. Even if you don’t adopt all the ideas you come across, it can help you to at least consider them.

Many people in business believe that they should set their personal feelings aside and work purely from a logical, rational place. However, every company has its own culture. So when you hire people to join your business, you want them to understand it and work with your teams towards a common goal. It will be most harmoniously done if their values align with yours.

There are many consultants out there, and it’s quite likely that they’re all good ones.  However, this doesn’t mean that they’re going to be right for you. In order to have a good working relationship with a consultant, his advice has to feel right to you.  And you need to feel like the consultant you’re working with gets you.  You ought to feel like he’s treating you as a partner, and not just trying to impress you with everything he can do.

In this dog-eat-dog world, honesty is important. And if you can find a consultant who can tell it like it is, you’ve found a rare creature whom you should hold on to!

Last but not least, there is a price advantage to put consultants in competition. If the consultants know that you will examine other offers, they will give their best efforts to design and price their proposal.

Of course, you could always argue that you will take the best for the job regardless of the price, but we all know what pressure on expenses the executives have to live with, especially operating expenses. And therefore, the better the cost for value trade-off will be, the easier it will be to convince your boss or your board that this consultant is the right choice.

And organizing a healthy competition is not as complex as one could think.

Identify the project’s scope and budget. Create a Request for Proposal (RFP) to formalize your expectations of the project. Short-list and brief potential providers. Examine the proposals and set up face-to-face meetings with the most promising ones. Choose your preferred vendor based on a balanced range of criteria.

It’s a good idea to evaluate several consultants by putting them in competition. It will enable you to make an informed choice on what consultant is right for you on many levels, such as skills, fit, and price. Along the way, you may even go for ideas that are completely out the box you had yourself designed in your request for proposal.

That’s it for today. Next time, I’ll explain how to find the right consultants for a project.

In the meantime, if you have any questions, or want to learn more about what we do at consulting quest, just send me an email at helene.laffitte@consultingquest.com

You can also have a look at our website smartconsultingsourcing.com to know more about our book and download free templates & guides to improve your consulting sourcing.

Bye and see you next week! Au revoir!

This Week In Consulting: Opportunities for the natural resources industry

compensation strategy

Wednesday, September 29th 2021

This week in
Consulting

Opportunities for the natural resources industry

This week’s must read

While most sectors of the economy are expected to decrease in 2020, renewable energy investment is expected to expand.
The correct valuation approach is critical in all areas, and there are two main options: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) and implied internal rate of return (IRR) (IRR).

This Week’s Must Read is an insight piece from Tomas Freyman, Grant Thornton about the valuation of renewable energy assets.

Tomas Freyman@Grant Thornton

Thought Leadership

Solar power is a rapidly growing industry, driven by environmental imperatives and advances in technology. Solar panels are installed on rooftops and in solar farms across the world, but there is always a need for more material to build these systems.

Kamil Wlazly @Wood Mackenzie

What does the term “sustainability” signify in today’s energy industry?
An in-depth Roundtable with experts from L.E.K. Consulting’s Energy & Environment practice discussing sustainability’s impact on the energy business.

Nilesh Dayal, Franco Ciulla, Amar Gujral and Mazen A. Skaf@L.E.K

Public and private companies across the globe are increasingly aware of the risks posed by climate change. However, many global corporations are failing to adequately plan for these future impacts.

Sherif Andrawes and Catherine Bell@BDO

Companies in the oil and gas and mining industries that have prospered over time have necessarily learned to navigate through cycles. What are Political risk facing oil and gas and mining companies during these unprecedented times?

Graham Knight , Christophe Meurier and Stuart Ashworth@Willis Towers Watson

This week’s Consulting News

| @Praxis Global Alliance

| @Cision

| @FTI Consulting

| @Centric Consulting

Keep in touch and get our bi-weekly email!

This week’s media

This video presents the role of life and biological sciences and innovation for sustainable use of natural resources.

Consulting sourcing tips

Previous Weeks’ issues

4 Steps to Assess Proposals for a Consulting Project: a definite guide

Consulting RFPs

4 Steps to Assess Proposals for a Consulting Project: a definite guide

A consulting project can be a great way for your business to create value. However, the request for proposal process is often extensive and complicated.

4 Steps to Assess Proposals for a Consulting Project: a definite guide

This guide will walk you through 4 steps that will help assess any consulting proposals you may receive in the future!

READ ALSO

There are many tricks you can use to buy consulting services, but the one I want to share with you today is what we call “The Consulting Sourcing Trick.”

Step # 1: Create the right process to assess the proposals

Narrow down to the most promising proposals

On a large project, your shortlist may still matter. So if you want to devote enough time to each possibility, funnel it down to the top choices, and set aside the rest of the work, think of it as a funnel that loads with all of the proposals.

You should start with the most promising bids. At the absolute minimum, these fulfill all of your RFP’s requirements. The proposals are convincing, and you have a clear picture of how the project would progress.

Above the top-of-funnel are projects that have fallen slightly off track but may still be salvaged. Perhaps they have a solid rationale, but they’ve overlooked an insignificant step. You don’t want to prematurely eliminate a potential treasure in the process.

Off-topic or overly general proposals appear at the top of the funnel. Do not immediately eliminate all of the other ideas; they are still very important.

Don’t get too far ahead of yourself. Once you’ve chosen a firm and have agreed on a fee, the process isn’t finished until you’ve signed a contract with them. Don’t be hasty in rejecting the second-runner.

Don’t overlook a unique consulting firm’s proposal with a fantastic concept but subpar writing/presentation abilities. There may be a way to implement at least part of the solution in your company.

When you send a response to potential consulting vendors with rejected proposals, regardless of how you feel about their most recent bid, don’t be hasty to cut ties. Here’s why: these consultants may transform into excellent partners or future suppliers in a world of fast transformation.

Build the right team to assess the proposals

You’ve received the bids in hand that, at first look, appear to fulfill your eligibility criteria and other key factors. It’s time to get down to business and choose your evaluation team.

Who is likely to be on your team of reviewers? Procurement experts, naturally, and the person in charge of the consulting budget, if any. You should also include the main stakeholders, such as the project leader and representatives from the impacted functions. Perhaps a senior executive or two who has worked with consulting before. Ideally, the panel of assessors should be composed of people who were involved in creating the RFP.

Input from a variety of stakeholders aids in making the evaluation procedure seem impartial and more likely to result in the best proposal for your project.

Consider including a competent and experienced consultant on the team to assist you in developing a procurement process that will bring you the greatest possible benefit for your business.

Set the ground rules for the evaluation

It’s critical to have all of your evaluators on the same page when it comes to a few fundamental principles:

  • Your project’s goals must be answered in the winning proposal.

  • The chosen method will further the project’s overall goal.

  • The consultants must have the required skills.

  • You must choose qualified consulting providers who are a good fit for your company culture.

Agree on the most appropriate approach based on the project’s context and culture. You may want to use a unique, creative, breakthrough, or transformative technique in your firm’s strategy. Alternatively, you could prefer a tried-and-true approach.

Encourage the team to evaluate the proposed solutions in terms of problem resolution, clarity, internal consistency, and ease of implementation, as well as outside-the-box thinking.

Step #2: Make sure the consulting firm is eligible

There are certain requirements to work with your firm. And a preliminary examination may immediately eliminate a consulting service and save you some time.

Many businesses have stringent registration restrictions, which include extensive checks. Check to see whether your consulting business is already registered or if your project qualifies for an exceptional procedure.

It may seem formal, but the fact that they’ve already taken the time to register with your company will give you an indication of their dedication and capacity to meet your demands. If a consultant submits a proposal too late, incomplete, or not in accordance with the format, it is because he or she has misunderstood your requirements or does not want to adapt to your methods. In either case, there is an issue.

Hiring the wrong consulting company might harm your reputation both inside and outside the organization. Make sure that your supplier’s ethics are in line with yours.

Consultants frequently deal with a variety of businesses in the same sector and/or geographic location. Even if they establish Chinese walls to safeguard your privacy, you might want to double-check for a potential conflict of interest.

Finally, with the globalization of consulting projects, an increasing number of clients are seeking outside sources. It’s not unusual for a European consulting firm to be chosen for a project by a U.S. client. When you are working with a company that will fly their consultants to your premises, ensure they have adequate work authorizations for your country and your industry.

Step #3: Check if the proposal answers your needs

You’re bringing the consulting firm to help you achieve a specific objective, of course. You want them to understand your goals and assist you in finding and implementing a solution.

Is the proposal answering your RFP?

A proposal that doesn’t thoroughly describe your needs implies a limited knowledge of your company, a rushed or generic offer, or some combination thereof. On this point, you must be firm.

You want to be sure the consultant responds to your queries and contributes something beyond simply repeating your RFP. The offer may include elements that don’t appear to be connected. Several causes might explain this pattern.

The first alternative is that you are dealing with a “cookie-cutter” problem. The consultant is copying and pasting a previous proposal for your project. The second alternative is for the consultants to have seen an objective that you had overlooked in your RFP.

In each case, you must demand that the consultant double-check the fit with your needs. You must buy only what you need, and nothing more.

Do the deliverables completely satisfy you?

Once you’ve confirmed that the consultants have comprehended your goals, you should review the deliverables they proposed in the bid to seeing whether they will truly answer your queries.

It’s critical to ensure that the consultants have addressed all key elements of the scope and that you may compare the proposals’ core.

Return to your RFP and check one by one for any unanticipated deliverables. Determine what’s outside the scope of the bid. Sometimes consultants take the initiative to rearrange and regroup the deliverables on their own. Make sure all of your intended outputs are still in place.

In other situations, the consultants provide items that were not mentioned in the RFP. Examine how they fit into your key goals. It may be a nice addition or simply an attempt by the consultant to broaden the scope (and price). If the product is relevant, consider if it’s a must-have or a nice-to-have.

Are the proposed timeline and the phasing aligned with your expectations?

Is the timeline consistent with your company’s goals? Is it a significant problem if it isn’t? Have the experts explained why they shortened the schedule?

Consultants adore to chop a project up into numerous phases. When comparing the various bids, make sure each phase has the same amount of work and items. It’s not unusual for a consulting firm to descope or underprice the initial phase in order to win the contract and accumulate greater expenses in later phases.

For very large projects (i.e. screening, acquisition, integration), we recommend including phasing and committing only to the first phase in the RFP. The following phases will be handled through a second RFP. It will put the winner of the initial project under considerable strain, requiring him to perform well during each phase of the project.

Is the project organized and staffed properly?

Sometimes it’s due to the different responsibilities (and thus workload) of consultants vs. your staff that one offer is more expensive than another.

How will the project’s management be structured? How is the project led at the steering level? What type of assistance do you anticipate from your teams at each phase of the process?

When compared with the workload of the project, does the team appear to be enough? And on the other side, is it possible that the crew is too big?

Step #4: Do you want to work with this consulting firm?

Don’t accept a proposal just because it looks good on paper. You have to feel comfortable with the approach and be willing to work with them.

Does it feel right?

Examine the approach suggested by the consultant. Is it what you wanted? Is it sensible? Is it appropriate for your requirements?

Check if there are potential limitations of the approach that the consultant is suggesting. Will this approach support a proper buy-in?

Look at who are the members of the consulting team and how you interacted with them. Do you think they will get along with your staff and be a good fit?

Last but not least, you need to check the leadership of the project team and its credibility with your teams. What is the level of seniority of the partner in charge? Is he taking responsibility for the project or delegating that to someone more junior? What is the level of experience of the project team? Will this work with your teams?

Now that you know the process for evaluating consulting proposals, it’s time to pick one. Think about what is important to your business and make sure the proposal aligns with those needs.

If there are still questions left unanswered or if you need help deciding which firm would be best suited for your company, reach out! We want to see your organization succeed as much as you do. Which of these tips will you use?

Hélène Laffitte
Co-founder & CEO at Consulting Quest
Hélène is the author of Smart Consulting Sourcing, a step by step guide to getting the best ROI from your Consuting. You can follow @helenelaffitte on Twitter.

Hélène Laffitte is the CEO of Consulting Quest, a Global Performance-Driven Consulting Platform and author of “Smart Consulting Sourcing”, a step by step guide to getting the best ROI from your consulting. With a blend of experience in Procurement and Consulting, Hélène is passionate about helping Companies create more value through Consulting.

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Podcast | How to build positive relationships with your consulting firms?

RFP

Positive and mutually beneficial relationships with business partners, clients, and collaborators are essential for every project. And effective communication is a crucial ingredient in every relationship.

On this week’s Smart consulting Sourcing podcast, I give you my tips to build positive relationships with your consulting firms.

Key Takeaway: Because consulting is a human-to-human service, the quality of your relationship with your consulting partners will directly affect the results of your projects. Putting the consultants in the right conditions to work, managing the project closely, and measuring performance are crucial steps to capture the right value from a consulting assignment.

Transcript

 

Hello and welcome to episode 58 of our podcast: Smart Consulting Sourcing, THE podcast about Consulting Procurement.

My name is Hélène, and I’ll be your host today.

Each week I’ll give you the keys to better use, manage and source consulting services.

This week, I’ll give you my tips to build positive relationships with your consulting firms

Last week, I answered 7 questions about internal vs external consultants

We saw that there are pros and cons to working with both internal and external consultants. Again, you should decide based on the needs of each project. When you have an internal consulting group, it makes sense to integrate them in a project bid when their competencies cover the scope. Put them in competition when necessary, and measure performance. They will get all the keys to serving their internal clients better.

Positive and mutually beneficial relationships with business partners, clients, and collaborators are essential for every project. And effective communication is a crucial ingredient in every relationship.

So let’s talk about how having a great relationship with your Consulting provider can substantially benefit the project.

We have mentioned previously the importance of collaboration with consulting firms to maximize the project’s chances of success. When the consulting partners consider your company a “good client,” they will do their best to deliver the best work, assign their best teams, and remit their best price.

The main goal is to create a mutually beneficial relationship –

At its core, consulting should be based on a mutually beneficial partnership. If you treat procurement as a linear process that ends the moment the contract ink dries, you will probably have trouble getting the best possible results out of that partnership. Try, instead, treating the relationship as dynamic and flexible throughout the project. You and your consultants will both benefit and improve your business practices as a result.

The truth is that if you treat them fairly, there is a good chance that they act the same way. Expect them to deliver their work on time and quality. Treat them like partners that have a common objective. Give them feedback, good or bad, on their performance. Give them visibility on payments. Be thorough, but don’t dance on the head of a pin.

So you have to manage the life of the project.

No matter how hard you try, establishing and maintaining a relationship with consultants in executing a project will not be a linear process. During a project, some changes will occur that you didn’t account for during the proposal or contract. Whatever happens during the project, make sure you trace the most important events.

Keep track of the changes, such as:

  • Scope changes

You might have to add new tasks as a need becomes clearer or drop deliverables that turn out to be impossible or difficult to reach.

  • Staffing changes

Organizations are in constant flux, and both sides may have to account for a turnover that requires adjustment and additional training.

  • Timeline changes

Before the project starts, everything is an estimate; you may have to adjust the pace as the actual duration of the project comes into view.

  • Unforeseen events

Budget changes, project merges, project freezes, or any other events that affect the project’s execution.

Change management is necessary to ensure that these changes do not derail the project. When the changes are significant and impact the scope and the deliverables, you should consider amending the contract. For other cases, the minutes of the Steering Committee where the decision was made should suffice.

Any interaction with the consultants, especially when the performance is not right, should be traced thoroughly. Make sure to keep the minutes of the meetings and share them with the consultants timely.

And always measure performance –

For projects longer than three months, we recommend organizing a mid-project assessment. As early as possible, set yourself and your consultants a benchmark toward the middle of the project. It is the perfect time to review the current scope and deliverables and check if they align with the objectives and the current business environment.

Before the meeting, collect the main stakeholders’ feedback and prepare a summary to share with your consulting providers. The input should cover the traditional project management performance dimensions, such as project completion, planning, etc., but also a more qualitative aspect such as behavioral dimensions, impact, or skills adequation.

As you get into the details of any project, it’s easy to get carried away with minutia that ultimately won’t affect the overall success. A Mid-Project Assessment enables you and your team to ensure that these inevitable tangents don’t endanger the larger project’s timeline and success.

The Mid-Project Assessment should be a major event for everyone involved. Keep it separate from regular operational project reviews, which should happen in smaller circles and regularly. However, you can organize regular check-ins dedicated to the project reviews to anticipate the potential issues and allow the Consulting Firm to fix the problem as soon as it appears.

Finally, don’t drop the ball towards the end.

One of the most common mistakes when using consultants is to drop the ball towards the end of the project. Here is what happens and why it should be prevented: Reports get shelved. Information is being poorly transferred. People that oppose the project step-in to torpedo it one last time. Making sure the results will stick requires specific attention, dedicated efforts, and it affects the overall success of the endeavor.

As the project is completed, ensure all deliverables and services are received and don’t make the final payment before verification. As a good practice, the last step in the reception and acceptance of the project is to perform an end-of-project assessment.

Because consulting is a human-to-human service, the quality of your relationship with your consulting partners will directly affect the result of your project. Putting the consultants in the right conditions to work, managing the project closely, and measuring performance are crucial steps to capture the right value from a consulting assignment.

That’s it for today. Next time, I’ll explain why you should put consultants in competition​.

In the meantime, if you have any questions, or want to learn more about what we do at consulting quest, just send me an email at helene.laffitte@consultingquest.com

You can also have a look at our website smartconsultingsourcing.com to know more about our book and download free templates & guides to improve your consulting sourcing.

Bye and see you next week! Au revoir!